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Hiroshi66 Profile
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Re: The Korean Wave


Interesting and a bit ironic, nchristi. I guess you could say that he is describing both of his cultures - Japanese and Korean.
2/15/2005, 7:50 pm Link to this post Send Email to Hiroshi66   Send PM to Hiroshi66 AIM
 
Takara Profile
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Re: The Korean Wave


引用 (quote):

Triple Lei wrote:classblockquoteHiroshi66 wrote:

Well, I mean it is sounding a lot like all people who are into Asian culture are readily accepting Korean dramas and culture. I don't watch Korean dramas - for one thing. I was just pointing out that there has to be a lot of Japanese or Chinese who are getting ticked off at the Korean Wave.
Does this really need to be said? Racists are everywhere and Japan is no exception. It just sounds like you're a little ticked off at the Korean Wave. Image

Me, on the Korean Wave: [img]
" rbtag2="rb-qdecode-href-en" rbcvt="1">http://www.rustedmind.net/~jsison/_smilies/rock.gif[/img]Image

You? : ImageImage

that site that you had linked to...it's kinda scary...



Last edited by Takara, 2/17/2005, 10:52 pm


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Hiroshi66 Profile
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Re: The Korean Wave


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Takara wrote:

that site that you haed linked to...it's kinda scary...

It is. He's sort of like the populist of the foreigners in Japan. ^^
2/17/2005, 10:03 pm Link to this post Send Email to Hiroshi66   Send PM to Hiroshi66 AIM
 
nchristi Profile
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Re: The Korean Wave


More on violinist Jung Chanwoo quoted from Harvest Time TV interview in February 2005.

In January of 2001, a South Korean exchange student and a Japanese cameraman lost their lives trying to help someone that had fallen off the platform and onto the tracks at the Japan Railways Shin-Okubo station. This incident greatly moved Chanwoo Jung, a South Korean violinist living in Japan at the time. As a memorial tribute to the two, he performed a solo mini-concert at the Shin-Okubo station [and continues to have an annual concert there].

As a Korean resident of Japan, Jung says that his long-term vision is now to serve as a bridge-builder between the Korean and Japanese people, as well as between North and South Koreans.classblockquoteIn Japan, people say that my music sounds very high-spirited and dramatic. But at Korea, people describe my music as delicate, warm, and fuzzy. If I combined these two aspects, something great could come out of it. I thought I might be able to create a new sound of my own. If I could mix Japan‛s delicateness, Korea‛s boldness, and give it a Western "color," I might be able to create something great.Jung Chanwoo performs using a Guarneri del Gesu violin, formerly owned and played by Albert Einstein. He has served as Concert Master of the Korean National Orchestra, the Tokyo Symphony, and Korean KBS Orchestra. He was born in Japan and has lived in Korea, as well. For the past 18 years, his home and main orchestral work have been in Korea. When asked in the interview how he felt about the two countries, he replied that he loves them both. Having been raised in Japan in his early years, he considers Japan his "mother" and loves Korea equally as his "foster mother." [Mr. Jung has a most affable, expressive, and outgoing personality.]classpclasspImage

Image
Bremen
2/21/2005, 9:22 am Link to this post Send Email to nchristi   Send PM to nchristi AIM
 
Hiroshi66 Profile
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Re: The Korean Wave


I think that this is how all Koreans should act. And how all Japanese should act as well. Today, most Koreans over here despise Japan. They hate it. They don't give it a chance. Equally, quite a few Japanese see Koreans "as dogs", especially the right-wing nationalists. Can't we just stop the rivalry already? 1945 is OVER. DONE.

Mature people like this make me happy since they make an effort to make relations better between Japan and the Korean Republic.
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Re: The Korean Wave


Just a reminder of why we love the dramas, our attempt to obtain recognition . . . and for those of you who may have never read the article (this appears to be an edited version). Question for Mikey or ccwf is Chic. brd referred to in article related to this brd?

Korean soaps lure unlikely audience
By Monica Eng
Chicago Tribune staff reporter
Published July 9, 2004
 
On a recent Saturday night a group of white, middle-class TV fans gathered at a Northwest Side cafe to watch the final episode of their favorite show and to say goodbye to a cast of ethnically homogenous characters who had come to feel like friends.
 
Their names, however, were not Joey, Chandler, Phoebe or Rachel.
 
But rather Jang Geum, Jung Ho, Geum Young and Joong Jong .
 
They were the main players of the Korean-language drama "A Jewel in the Palace" or Dae Jang-Geum, sixty-part dramatic serial shown on WOCH-Ch. 28 that has turned scores of non-Korean Chicagoans into junkies.
 
"Many of us stumbled on the shows on 28 while flipping channels and wound up getting addicted," says J.P. Paulus of Chicago, who runs one of a handful of English-language Web sites for Korean drama addicts looking for an online fix.
 
Although "Dae Jang-Geum" wrapped up last week, Korean drama junkies needn't panic. The next Korean series, "Firebird," kicks off its run with subtitles at 8 p.m. Friday
 
Chicago's Albany Park-based, low-power station, Ch. 28 (which is not available on any cable systems) started subtitling the dramas a few years ago, primarily to reconnect second-generation Korean Americans to their culture. But when the station did a viewership survey last year to see how the endeavor was working, station managers discovered they had attracted a sizable non-Korean fan base.
 
"We got about 500 e-mails from people who were not Korean but who were fans of the show," says Kwang Dong Jo, vice president of the station that is also known as KBC-TV. "We never expected that the non-Korean Americans would be watching these shows."
 
But they were, each falling into it in similar accidental ways and getting hooked.
 
"I was flipping through the TV, and there was this historical drama with subtitles that I just started following, and I got hooked," says Darinka D'Alessio. "My husband originally would walk past while I watching and say, 'You're nuts,' but now he is sucked into it too."
 
Many viewers assumed they were alone in this odd secret pleasure until they found fellow obsessives online.
 
"I was watching Asian dramas for the better part of 10 years, and I just stumbled on the Web site accidentally," says Nancy, a Southern California resident who asked not to reveal her last name. "It's like a secret society that I had no idea about. It was like a veil was lifted and I was really able to get into them and understand them. Then I realized that there was this whole strata of non-Asians watching."
 
Non-Korean fans cite many reasons they're hooked on the shows, including an emphasis on family, minimal sex and violence, high production values and the chance to peek into another culture.
 
Tired of rude kids on TV
 
"I am interested in how the family gets along, what the grocery store looks like, how old are they when they get married and do they go to college," Carolyn Hazzard of Chicago says. "Even though they are non-violent for the most part, the parents do slap the kids a lot. I got tired of regular TV with rude kids on sitcoms, saying things that I would never allow my kids to say."
 
Kathleen Wrobel of Oak Park says she appreciates the show's no-nonsense approach to discipline and morality.
 
"There seems to be such a focus on doing the right thing without any political correctness," Wrobel says. "People just get whacked in the head, and the parents and grandparents will even smack the adults. Everyone is not running around with everyone else's wife -- and if they do, they pay dearly."
 
But Chicago fans aren't alone. If you go by the traffic on national Web sites, you find fans cropping up in every market where Korean television stations broadcast the shows -- sometimes without subtitles. Clusters in New York, Southern California, Seattle, Hawaii and Philadelphia (where it is shown on PBS) jump online to kibitz about the latest episodes. Paulus' Web site features a chart of recent dramas as well as links to other English language fan sites, while www.koreanwiz.org, explain Korean family customs, business standards, foods, drink, architecture and gestures.
 
But Americans are only a tiny -- if unintended sector -- of the international Korean drama fan base.
 
In the past half decade Korean culture has flooded Asia in what has been dubbed "Hallyu," or the "Korean wave." Films, food, fashion, music and especially TV dramas from South Korea have emerged as major cultural and economic forces in China and Japan.
 
"Things like Chinese clothing companies and beauty shops are affected because immediately the people want the clothes and hairdos they see on the Korean dramas," notes Jo. "And in Japan, about three months ago, for the first time a major Japanese network put the Korean drama `Winter Love' on in prime time. The Japanese are very proud of their culture, and so this is such a big step."
 
Second-generation viewers
 
Many parents of Korean-American kids hoped these shows would also boost the morale and cultural interest of their children, but Jo says the second generation hardly responded to the call for e-mails about the subtitling.
 
"The second-generation boys don't watch because there is so much romance and they think it is woman stuff, but I know that many second-generation girls are watching," he says. "They just don't give us a lot of feedback, and I attribute that to a passiveness in our culture."
 
A group of non-Korean fans, however, spent the twilight hours of a warm Saturday last month riveted to a big-screen TV at a cafe as "Dae Jang-Geum" departed from their lives with an action-packed final episode.
 
In it, the plucky heroine who had worked her way up from lowly royal kitchen worker to the king's personal physician navigates a sea of treachery in the royal court. She informs the king that his frequent bouts of diarrhea have left him with damaged intestines and that she must operate. Knowing that his advisers will kill her if she attempts the controversial (for the 16th Century) surgery, the king has a group of eunuchs kidnap her and take her to China. In a letter he explains that he did this out of love for her.
 
"You get sad when a show ends," says Ken Morris of Chicago who was at the cafe with his wife and fellow fan, Joan. "But at the same time, that is another thing we like about them. Unlike a lot of American shows, these ones do have an ending."
 
In addition to "Firebird," which airs at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, WOCH-Ch. 28 broadcasts other subtitled dramas: the hour-long "The Age of Warriors" at 8 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays; and the 30-minute daily drama "One Million Roses" at 6 p.m., Mondays through Fridays. Last Edit: Dec 27th, 2004

BTW -- While Bae travels thru snowstorms giving everyone Yun-fluenza KWON SANG WOO is now #1 celeb atop the wave, giving everyone KSW F E V E R !!! . . just what the doctor ordered for cure of Yun-fluenza.

Image
banner credit xuexi for KSW sizzle!



Last edited by star1, 3/31/2005, 9:31 am
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Re: The Korean Wave


classblockquotestar1 wrote:

Question for Mikey or ccwf is Chic. brd referred to in article related to this brd?
We're not affiliated, but they are indeed “the Chicago board” to which we have sometimes referred. If you haven't already, you should check them out.

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Re: The Korean Wave


Thank you, ccwf. Checked it out, from what I could tell (and after seeing Mikey's posts), recalled Knov also visits here occ. Too many connections; I could only check one topic. Wonder how many members they have . . . anywayzzzz, ya' all . . . here's my bottom line:

      'Our' wonderful board totally kicks! Thanks
 to ccwf & Company we have awesome features, colors, threads, etc.

Thanks to ccwf, Chief creidesca, all mods, and super members for making this one heck of a place to stop/look/talk . . .incomparable . . . there's no place like home!
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Was Dae Jung Gum aired in English subs in Chicago? Its not aired with subs here.
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Re: The Korean Wave


Sorry I’m a little late to the party. emoticon I spent a LONG weekend in California and I’m only now catching up with the piles and piles of stuff waiting for me on my computer.classblockquoteHiroshi66 wrote:

Was Dae Jung Gum aired in English subs in Chicago? Its not aired with subs here.
“The Great Jang-geum” (as it was called in Chicago) was indeed English subtitled there. I understand that Michael Han (the skilled and dedicated subtitler who was recently – and inexplicably – terminated from his position at the Chicago station) did the subtitles for the local Chicago market. And, as far as I know, nobody else, anywhere in the world, got to watch an English subtitled version. The show was just wildly popular in Chicago, and it’s unfortunate that the rest of us English-only speakers apparently missed out on a really good one.classblockquotestar1 wrote:

Too many connections; I could only check one topic. Wonder how many members they have . . .
The Chicago board often interrupts you with the “too many connections” message, and while that briefly stroked the egos of the Chicago fans (“So many of us K-drama fans, the board can’t even keep up!) it turned out that Proboards (who hosts the Chicago board) also hosts a whole bunch of other boards, too, and they often get choked with all the traffic. But, the Chicago board does have something over 900 members. It was actually the first Asian drama board I joined - almost a year, as I recall, before this California board arrived on the scene. There's a lot of fine people in the Windy City.
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